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 La créatine

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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Jeu 6 Jan - 1:55

Creatine-protein-carbohydrate supplements?

Creatine-protein-carbohydrate supplements
A recent study found that creatine had an additive effect to protein/carbohydrate supplements used alone in terms of increasing muscle hypertrophy.


Study Background:
“PURPOSE: Studies attributing gains in strength and lean body mass (LBM) to creatine monohydrate (CrM) during resistance exercise (RE) training have not assessed these changes alongside cellular and subcellular adaptations. Additionally, CrM-treated groups have seldom been compared with a group receiving a placebo similar in nitrogen and energy. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a CrM-containing protein-carbohydrate (PRO-CHO) supplement in comparison with a supplement containing a similar amount of nitrogen and energy on body composition, muscle strength, fiber-specific hypertrophy, and contractile protein accrual during RE training.”
Study conclusions:
“CONCLUSIONS: In RE-trained participants, supplementation with Cr-PRO-CHO provided greater muscle hypertrophy than an equivalent dose of PRO-CHO, and this response was apparent at three levels of physiology (LBM, fiber CSA, and contractile protein content).”
Summary:
In short, Creatine supplementation resulted in more muscle hypertrophy than protein/carbohydrate supplementation alone.

Reference:

Cribb PJ, Williams AD, Hayes A. A creatine-protein-carbohydrate supplement enhances responses to resistance training. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Nov;39(11):1960-8.

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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Sam 7 Mai - 1:51

Creatine Commandments by Anthony Almada

Shred of Evidence

By Anthony L. Almada, MSc, FISSN

Creatine Commandments I



There’s no doubt that you have tried creatine at least once in your life. I’ll place my bet that for most of you it was creatine monohydrate— that ‘ancient, prehistoric’ form that we sprang onto the sports-nutrition scene over 16 years ago (thanks to some brilliant European exercise scientists, yours truly and Ed Byrd, in the first months of our previous company called EAS).

Being a student of creatine for two decades— in both university research labs and in the trenches of nutrition stores, bodybuilding and trade shows, and magazines— I have been both excited and forced to restrain explosive vomiting. Trying to control the kooky creatine evangelists is like trying to control religion or herding hummingbirds. For those readers who rely on common sense and critical thinking, I offer two of my several Creatine Commandments:

1. Creatine monohydrate easily survives transit through the stomach and is very well absorbed.

Think about it: if creatine monohydrate did not survive through the ‘treacherous’ environment of the stomach and its bubbling acid, how do you explain:

a) The rapid rise of creatine in the blood after oral dosing (if the amount in the blood increases, it has ‘survived’ the ‘acid cauldron’ of the stomach, intact).

b) The significant amount of creatine (not creatinine) that appears in the urine after daily dosing with tens of grams (if creatine appears in the urine in far greater amounts than before creatine monohydrate supplementation started, then the only place it came from was your supplement, not through a transdermal creatine body wash or from your body making its own creatine).

c) The impressive rise in muscle creatine (not creatinine) content after only a few days of oral creatine monohydrate supplementation.

And, the most obvious one:

d) The dozens of university studies showing oral creatine monohydrate supplementation increases muscular strength and power, muscle fiber size, and even arm muscle thickness in several days to a few weeks.1-3 That sure as heck isn’t coming from creatinine!

Two studies offer elegant, undeniable proof of creatine monohydrate heroically surviving the apparent hellfire conditions of the stomach, and entering the warm, spa-like luxury of the blood, in humans. In the first study, 5 grams of ‘tagged’ creatine monohydrate (CrM) was given to a 32-year-old resistance-trained male.4 The non-radioactive tag enabled the researchers to unambiguously determine the fate of creatine, as seen in the blood and urine.

Ten minutes after the 5-gram dose, the tagged creatine appeared in the blood— as creatine (must be magic). Twenty minutes later, blood creatine spiked up over eight times higher than before the CrM dose. The authors found that only about 10 percent of the tagged CrM was converted to creatinine, and that creatine uptake was 78 percent of the dose. Within about 2 hours after the CrM dose, all of the creatine and creatinine had been excreted in the urine.

In the second study, Herculean doses of ‘normal,’ untagged CrM were given— 20 grams at a single slug.5 Uniquely, pure creatinine was also dosed, at a separate time, in an amount that few Cajun-style buffet carnivores have ever encountered— 5 grams. This was one of the very few studies where the perhaps ‘ideal’ liquid delivery system was used to mix in the creatine— hot water.

About 3 hours after a 20-gram dose, blood creatine concentration jumped about 50-fold (for you percent junkies, that is a 5,000 percent increase). And how much did blood creatinine rise by? Get out your calculators: about 0.13-fold, or a leprechaunish 13 percent. How high did the blood creatinine rise after a 5-gram dose of creatinine? About fivefold, or 500 percent. This showed that creatinine is indeed absorbed when taken orally. If creatine formed creatinine in the stomach— in any significant amount— then it would be expected to ‘spike’ blood creatinine.

Do the math. Zero published studies in humans showed otherwise. Case closed. Move on to evidence and off of fairy tales.

2. Creatine drinks could contain creatine… for a certain time.

A few years after we introduced creatine monohydrate to North America and beyond, a friend called me, frothing with excitement, “A guy I know has made a creatine liquid that is stable! He’s done the lab testing and it really is stable!” For several years, this creatine liquid soared to new heights, capturing the emotions (and gullibility) of many— only tens of millions of dollars later to be ‘excused’ from at least one country (for false claims) and to all but evaporate from the U.S. market. Finally, in a study I collaborated on with some ‘creatine gods,’ we showed that this hallowed creatine liquid to raise blood creatine (after oral dosing) to the same degree as… water6 (read flatline).

A few years later, an Asian company that had a patented creatine drink contacted me. They claimed that it was ‘stable’ and it tasted just like water. Multiple lab tests using sophisticated equipment, and sampling to a bunch of my friends, proved it to indeed have about 5 grams of creatine monohydrate-equivalent, and taste almost like water. Six months later, we had it analyzed again and… poof! The creatine content had dropped by half, assuming a 50:50 mix with creatinine.

With the next generation of creatine-containing RTDs, the same questions apply: is it ‘shelf stable’ six months after it was made and transported in a hot truck halfway across country, or is it ‘freshness dated’ like a yogurt drink or even some beers? It’s easy to make a creatine RTD stable for a short while. The challenge is making it stable for the long haul. And if such a beverage was proven to be ‘shelf stable’ and to deliver creatine to the blood like CrM powder in water, is it worth the far greater cost?



Anthony L. Almada, MSc is trained as a nutritional/exercise biochemist (UC Berkeley) and is the co-founder of EAS, the company that introduced creatine to North America. He also introduced the terms ‘thermogenic’ and ‘cell volumizing’ into the nutrition industry. Starting in 1975, he has worked within all facets of the nutrition industry. He has been a research co-investigator on over 75 university studies and is the CEO of GENr8.

References:

1. Brosnan JT and Brosnan ME. Ann Rev Nutr, 2007;27:242-61.

2. Branch JD. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2003;13:198-226.

3. Chilibeck PD, et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 2004;36:1781-8.

4. MacNeil L, et al. J Chromatogr B, 2005;827:210-5.

5. Schedel JM, et al. Life Sci, 1999;65:2463-70.

6. Harris RC, et al. J Sports Sci, 2004;22: 851-7.
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DBS

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 11 Juil - 0:34

DBS a écrit:
Moi je me prend plus la tête: j'achète des capsule vide à la pharmacie. 30€ en plus par an, mais une facilité de prise. yep

This is how we do angel

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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 11 Juil - 1:16

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DBS

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 11 Juil - 1:38

Ça fait un moment que j'y pense! Malgré que ça me prend pas trop de temps (5 min par semaine), ça pourrait être bien pratique.
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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 11 Juil - 1:44

DBS a écrit:
Ça fait un moment que j'y pense! Malgré que ça me prend pas trop de temps (5 min par semaine), ça pourrait être bien pratique.

ca vaut pas le coup de s'en privé Wink
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DBS

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 11 Juil - 3:04

Tu as raison!

Je vais regarder demain la taille des capsules que j'ai car il m'en reste un peu plus de 2000 (c'est les plus grosses de la pharmacie, je pense que ce sont des 1g et sur le site c'est 735 mg).

Si non tu as essayé? Un conseil ou commander? (surtout pour les frais de port).

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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 11 Juil - 4:23

les tailles de capsules c'est 00 ou 000 sinon non je n'utilise pas ce genre de materiel.
Tu devrais trouver assez rapidement un bon compromis prix/ port yep
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ced31auterive

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Mar 26 Juil - 16:19

que pensez vous de cette créatine?
kre-alkalyn-1600 de la marque ist
il indique 2 gélules avant et apres l'entrainement, quant est il des jours de repos?
merci
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glutimus

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Mar 26 Juil - 16:50

DBS essaye sur myprotéine après je sais pas si c'est compétitif niveau tarifs là dessus?

Yabon les capsules
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ced31auterive

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Dim 31 Juil - 19:10

vous dites de ne pas prendre de créat pré training, hors dans tous les articles sur les suppléments dans muscle&fitness il dise d'en prendre pré et post training..... zarb
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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Dim 31 Juil - 19:17

Ces articles c'est de la pisse.

Si la prise de créatine n'est pas spécialement préconisée en pré-training c'est parce qu'elle semble avoir un effet légèrement hypoglycémiant.
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umag

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 28 Nov - 14:10

Quelqu'un a testé cette formule:
creatine hydrochloride

Alors nouveau coup marketing ou réel avancée?

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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 28 Nov - 15:51

umag a écrit:
Quelqu'un a testé cette formule:
creatine hydrochloride

Alors nouveau coup marketing ou réel avancée?


Sur le papier c'est miraculeux, le probléme c'est que la seule étude qui clame que c'est 59 fois mieux que de la kre alkalyne ou de l'ethyl ester, a été commandée et payée par ceux qui exploite ce brevet.... angel
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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 28 Nov - 16:27

C'est un procédé commun dans l'industrie pharmaceutique que d'utiliser de l'acide chlorhydrique ( HCL ) pour la faire réagir avec des bases organiques.
( Surtout avec des bases dotées d'une amine ( NH2 ) ; ce qui est le cas de la créatine soit dit en passant )

Ca formera des sels, ce qui accroîtra la solubilité du produit dans l'eau.

Pourquoi pas...mais faudra probablement pas s'attendre à quelque chose de miraculeux par rapport à ce qui aura déjà été fait avec les autres formes de créatines.
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umag

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 28 Nov - 18:47

C'est souvent le cas: Les études sont financés par le propre fabricant.
C'est pour cela, je demande souvent les avis des consommateurs.
Si un coup, j'ai l'occas de tester, je vous fait remonter l'info smack
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thejpman

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Sam 26 Jan - 4:07

Ending the Creatine Confusion

In an effort to gain maximal size, strength, and stamina,many athletes turn to popular ergogenic aids to supplement their training routines. One of the most popular of these supplements is creatine which in its supplemental form has become rather widespread. The discovery that the creatine and phosphocreatine content in human muscle can be increased by oral ingestion of supplemental creatine monohydrate has led to numerous studies examining its benefits on exercise performance. Another potential benefit that is of particular interest to strength athletes-including bodybuilders and physique athletes is an increase in lean body mass which results from the ingestion of creatine monohydrate.

Whether you’ve used creatine monohydrate yourself or know of others taking it there tends to be a great deal of confusion surrounding its safety, efficacy and proper use as a performance supplement.
The purpose of this article is to provide answers tomany of the common questions about creatinein order for athletesto make informed decisions that are based on researched evidence as opposed to a misinformed trainer, coach or biased supplement distributor. In order to provide accuracy and clarity, I sought out the expertise of Eric Rawson PhD.
Over the past decade and a half, Dr. Rawson’s research has focused on the interactions between nutrition and skeletal muscle. In particular, Dr. Rawson has extensively studied the effects of the dietary supplement creatine on muscle function. In fact, if you were to do a peer-reviewed journal search using the keyword “creatine”, Eric Rawson’s name would appear quite frequently. He is currently an Associate Editor for Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Amino Acids, the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, the ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal®, and has reviewed articles for more than 30 peer-reviewed journals. Rather than simply attempt to interpret his research, I decided to address him directly. Thankfully, he was kind enough provide me with answers to some common questions about creatine as well as to cite some of the research which supports them.

Safety
Despite the fact that no scientific studies prove any adverse side effects, there have been anecdotal reports of potential side effects-including muscle cramping or spasms, diarrhea, gas, and bloating and even kidney disease.
It is important to note that dietary supplements do not undergo the same pre-market testing as pharmaceutical drugs,however,there are many published research studies that demonstrate the safety of creatine monohydrate. And as Dr. Rawson notes, “the available evidence indicates that creatine monohydrate supplements have an excellent safety profile.”
While there are always more studies to be done in order to ensure safety from every angle there is always apotential side effect with any type of substance we put into our bodies. But as of now, creatine monohydrate, when ingested at recommended doses, appears to pose no serious threat to healthy athletes and bodybuilders.

Efficacy
Some athletes continue to remain skeptical about the legitimacy of creatine monohydrate as ergogenic aid.And someargue that creatine does little more than add water weight.So I asked Dr. Rawson based on his extensive research of creatine’s effect on muscle function, if creatine was in fact an effective supplement for increasing strength and lean body mass.

According to Dr. Rawson, “Increasing muscle creatine and phosphocreatine levels through creatine monohydrate supplementation has both indirect and direct effects on skeletal muscle. For instance, creatine monohydrate supplements allow athletes to train with increased training volume and recover more rapidly during brief, high-intensity, intermittent exercise (e.g. resistance training). Also, creatine monohydrate supplements increase expression of a variety of growth factors involved in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and function.”
Some research indicates that creatine may also be effective for people with certain medical conditions, including heart patients, and on some types of neuromuscular disease or orthopedic injury if taken at recommended doses.

Types of creatine
There a few different types and forms of creatine, but the most popular by far is creatine monohydrate in powder form, though it can be found in pill form as well. Other types of creatine include, phosphate, citrate, malate, and ester. However, nearly all of creatine research is on creatine monohydrate, including safety and efficacy studies. In addition,the absorption of creatine monohydrate is almost 100%, and the overall costis modest compared to other types.A word of caution, creatine monohydrate is not stabile in liquid and rapidly degrades to creatinine (Harris, R. C., Almada, A. L., Harris, D. B., Dunnett, M., Hespel, P.The creatine content of Creatine Serum and the change in the plasma concentration with ingestion of a single dose.J Sports Sci. 2004 Sep;22(9):851-7.).So, liquid creatine monohydrate supplements are not recommended. Also, there is some research indicating that creatine ethyl ester supplements are pro-creatinine (i.e. they convert to creatinine following ingestion) (Giese, M. W., Lecher, C. S.Non-enzymatic cyclization of creatine ethyl ester to creatinine.BiochemBiophys Res Commun. 2009 Oct 16;388(2):252-5. Based on this information,there doesn’t appear to be any benefit to using any other forms of creatine supplements.

Loading
When you hear about creatine supplements, you probably also hear about loading and maintenance phases. What does this mean?

Traditional creatine supplementation protocols include a brief 5 day high-dose of 20 grams per day or a longer-duration 4–6 week low-dose of 3 grams per day. Both the short-duration and high-dose and the longer-duration low-dose creatine supplementation methods have been proven effective at increasing muscle creatine content by about 20%, and both methods have been shown to improve exercise performance. (Hultman, E., Söderlund, K., Timmons, J. A., Cederblad, G., Greenhaff, P. L.Muscle creatine loading in men.J Appl Physiol. 1996 Jul;81(1):232-7.)

However, according to Dr. Rawson, differences in body composition, training goals, and competitive challenges could affect how creatine is best used. “Consider the differences between a pre-contest physique athlete (i.e. a bodybuilder) and an offensive lineman in gridiron (American) football. Both could be categorized as strength and power athletes, but they have very different needs and goals. Some simple guidelines for creatine monohydrate loading would be to consume about 0.3 grams/kg of body mass per day for five days. This should be divided into four equal servings throughout the day. Muscle uptake will be enhanced with a transient insulin spike induced through feeding. A large athlete, who is not concerned with caloric intake, could consume up to 50 grams of carbohydrate and 50 grams of protein with each serving of creatine monohydrate. This can be accomplished by combining the creatine monohydrate supplement with a meal (e.g. grilled chicken, brown rice, vegetables) or with a protein/carbohydrate (e.g. whey/dextrose) supplement. If caloric intake and the maintenance of low body fat are important, it would be best to consume creatine monohydrate after regular meals, instead of adding kilocalories to the diet. Muscle creatine uptake is also enhanced with exercise, so consuming creatine monohydrate supplements along with the immediate post-workout meal (food or supplement) may be helpful.”

Maintenance and Cycling
Human muscle appears to have an upper limit of Creatine storage which, once achieved, with diet or supplementation, cannot be exceeded.
As Dr. Rawson notes; “Once muscle creatine is elevated with short-term high-dose creatine monohydrate supplementation, elevated muscle creatine can be maintained with a low daily dose. The exact dose will vary and is based on meat intake and body size. Generally, the ingestion of 2 to 5 grams per day or 0.03 grams per kilogram of body mass per day is sufficient to maintainelevated muscle creatine level.“This is less than what many supplement labels recommend.

Although there is no physiological rationale for either cycling on and off creatine or for continuous useDr. Rawson believes there may be some practicality.
“If athletes use creatine monohydrate supplements to enhance their sports performance during the competitive season, they may consider not taking the supplement during the off season. Similarly, if athletes ingest creatine monohydrate during the off season (or during a hypertrophy phase for a physique athlete) they may consider not taking the supplement during the competitive season.”

Water Retention
Many physiqueathletes and their coaches will avoid using creatine prior to a competition in fear of it causing water retention and a softer puffy appearance. What I find somewhat amusing about this concern is that in my experience many of these same athletes and/or coaches will use or recommend anabolic androgenic agents that are KNOWN to cause water retention however they don’t seem to have the same concern to eliminate those substances during the pre-contest phase.And although creatine supplementation causes a small increase in total body water, there is no evidence that this will leave the athlete with a softer or less defined appearance. In fact, if intracellular fluid expands muscle volume, the muscles will more than likely have a fuller harder appearance. So unless water weight is stored just under the skinit wouldn’t result in a softer look.

Given the widespread use of creatine among bodybuilders and other athletes, the findings of Dr. Rawson as well as the other research cited supply reliable scientific information to athletes, trainers and coaches regarding the risks, benefits and effective protocols for the use of creatine monohydrate. Overall, creatine monohydrate, when ingested at recommended doses, appears to be a relatively safe and effective ergogenic aid. Hopefully, this information will allow athletes to make better decisions about the use of creatine to aid their training and muscle building needs.

Train smart and good luck!







References:
· Gualano, B., Roschel, H., Lancha, A. H., Brightbill, C. E., Rawson, E. S. In Sickness and in health: The widespread application of creatine supplementation. Amino Acids. 2012;43(2):519-29.
· Lopez R. M., Casa D. J., McDermott B. P., Ganio M. S., Armstrong L. E., Maresh C. M. Does creatine supplementation hinder exercise heat tolerance or hydration status? A systematic review with meta-analyses. J. Athl. Train. 2009;44(2):215-23.
· Persky, A. M. and Rawson, E. S. Safety of creatine supplementation in health and disease. In: Creatine and Creatine Kinase in Health and Disease. Eds: Gajja J. Salomons and Markus Wyss. Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 275-289, 2007.
· Rawson, E. S. and Persky, A. M. Mechanisms of muscular adaptations to creatine supplementation. Int. SportMed. J. 2007;8(2):43-53.
· Rawson, E. S. and Volek, J. S. The effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance. J. Strength Cond. Res. 2003;17(4):822-31.
· Jäger, R., Purpura, M., Shao, A., Inoue, T., Kreider, R. B. Analysis of the efficacy, safety, and regulatory status of novel forms of creatine. Amino Acids. 2011;40(5):1369-83
· Gualano, B., Hamilton, R., Lancha, A. H. Jr.,Brightbill, C. E., Rawson, E. S.; In sickness and in health: the widespread application of creatine supplementation. Amino Acids. 2012;43(2):519-29.
· Rawson, E. S., Stec, M. J., Frederickson, S. J., Miles, M. P. Low dose creatine supplementation enhances fatigue resistance in the absence of weight gain. Nutrition. 2011;27(4):451-45.

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MessageSujet: Re: La créatine   Lun 14 Déc - 0:20



Bonjour
1 article ( un de plus ) sur la créatine


( extrait http://www.irbms.com/creatine-dangereuse )

Toxicité de la créatine

La toxicité de la créatine est essentiellement rénale : néphropathies, insuffisance rénale…

On observe également des troubles du métabolisme du calcium, des pathologies cardiovasculaires. Il existe également une toxicité associée, par la contamination possible par des produits dopants, en rapport avec la fabrication illicite pas toujours « propre »dans certains pays.

La contamination peut également être d’une autre nature en fonction du mode d’extraction de la créatine. L’éventualité d’une origine animale de certains produits laisse suspecter une contamination possible par des maladies animales, dont le prion de l’ESB (encéphalopathie spongiforme bovine, maladie de Kreutsfeld Jacobs). Cette alerte sanitaire avait d’ailleurs été prononcée par le Ministère dès 1998.

Avis scientifiques objectifs

De nombreuses études ont montré l’inefficacité d’une supplémentation en créatine tant sur la puissance maximale développée, que sur les sensations de fatigue musculaire ou la récupération.

Cette inefficacité a notamment été retrouvée dans plusieurs disciplines :

la course à pied (Javierre et all 97)
la natation (Mujika et all 96)
le cyclisme (Odland et all 97)
l’aviron (Rossiter et all 96)
Il semble qu’après 1 semaine de supplémentation, la presque totalité d’une dose journalière soit retrouvée dans les urines (Marganaris et all 98). Les recherches sur des efforts de longue durée n’ont pas mis en évidence un gain de performance, et évoquent même une baisse du niveau de performance en rapport avec la prise de poids.

Conclusion

L’inefficacité de la créatine sur les performances est évidente. Seuls ceux qui la commercialisent vous diront le contraire ! Sa dangerosité a également été clairement établie, en rapport avec ses effets délétères graves sur la santé. La créatine n’est donc pas un produit dopant, car elle est sans effet sur les performances, mais reste toutefois dangereuse. La législation actuelle ne laisse aucun doute.
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La créatine

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MuscuPassion - Le Forum de musculation depuis 2007 :: ENTRAINEMENT ,NUTRITION ET SUPPLEMENTATION :: SUPPLEMENTATION-
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